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HUNTING HINTS

 

THE GROUND BLIND ADVANTAGE - The team at Ultimate Outdoor Adventurs TV has been hunting/filming from ground blinds for the past six years and we have definately made our share of mistakes, so we're hoping that these helpful hints might prevent you from making the same ones.

 

SUCCESSFUL TIPS
Dark / Clothing – Fleece / Wool
Use Spikes 8”-12” in ALL anchor points…
Stay in the Back Half of Blind…
Setup blind Prior to Hunt…
Practice Setting Up Blind…
Target Practice From Blind…
Comfortable Chair & Bow Holder…
Comfortable Distance From Game Trail… 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADVANTAGES        vs.        DISADVANTAGES
Quick Setup…                                       Lack of Visibility..
Mobility…                                            Low Light...
Safety / Comfort…
Multiple Hunters…
Concealment…
Weather…
Scent Control…
Multiple Species / Terrain... 

 

Things to consider when purchasing a blind!

Is There Enough Room…
Your Archery Setup…
Zippers And Velcro…
Setup And Takedown…
Hunter Concealment…
Cost Of Blind…
Full Day Hunting..
Young Hunters..

- Will it allow you and your archery setup enough room to take that once in a lifetime shot?
- With your personal archery setup, enter the blind and position your self for a typical shot, if the shooting diameter isn’t quite large enough don’t purchase the blind.
- Check to be sure that there is a minimal amount of noise when opening and closing shooting/viewing windows. Can this be done with an animal within shooting distance?
- If you hunt during windy conditions you might want to be sure the blind has a light or scent flap around the bottom of the blind.
- The next thing to consider is how easy the blind is to setup and take down. If one of your tools within your arsenal is not hunter friendly, then it will not get utilized.
- Just because you are inside of a ground blind doesn’t mean you are concealed. Have the salesperson get inside the blind and see for yourself whether there is appropriate hunter concealment.
- One thing that many hunters ignore in the sporting goods store is “wind” when purchasing a ground blind. Wind flap can make the difference between an awesome shot and a missed opportunity. If the blind appears to have loose - - material, allowing it to flap in the wind, then don’t waste your money.
- It is never a good idea to setup your blind next to the game trail or in their direct line of sight…look for shadows.
- What is your comfortable shooting distance?
- Netting the windows…

Other things to consider!

- Since most antelope hunting takes place in the wide open spaces, and there isn’t much for cover; we have found that it isn’t necessary to brush-up the blind…Prior to Hunt Setup!!
- Concentrate your efforts at frequently visited waterholes and fence crossings.
- Tip: When hunting at a waterhole be sure to fence around your blind if cattle are also using the waterhole.
- Turkeys are not scared of the blind…silhouetting and movement spook birds.
- Place decoys facing the blind…keep rear windows closed! 
- It is not necessary to brush-up the blind while hunting spring gobblers…match surroundings.

 

TREESTAND SETUP TIPS...

 

1.  Always look for a good background...

2.  Make it comfortable and level for long sits...

3.  Purchase a small tree saw to trim branches and shooting

     lanes...

4.  When clearing the tree to hang your stand, leave short

     limbs above your stand for hanging gear and gadgets...

5.  When possible, hang 2 stands, one for northwest winds and the second for a southest wind...

6.  Try to keep the sun at your back...

7.  Always wear a safety belt...

8.  Clear multiple shooting lanes...

9.  Your first time in a new stand is usually the best...

 

 

HELPFUL HNTING HINTS...

 

1.  Tie a 8 inch piece of yarn or frayed dental floss to the end of your stabilizer to detect the slightest wind changes.

2.  Coat your arrows with wax to help silence your draw.

3.  While trimming your tree for stand placement make sure to leave about four inch limbs sticking out above your stand for hanging fanny pack and other gadgets.

4.  While viewing game animals with binoculars, grab the bill of your hats with your remaining fingers for rock solid stability.

5.  Don’t always buy high power binoculars. Remember, the more you zoom in with high power optics the less stable your objects will appear.

6.  To prevent leaving a sent trail wear knee high rubber boots and tuck your pants inside while walking in and out of your stand.

7.  While sitting in your tree stand place your lower bow limb in the upper part or your hunting boot for better stability and less fatigue on your arm.

8.  Buy the best optics you can afford.

9.  Use a mounted adjustable bipod on your firearm for better stability and accuracy.

10. Watch videos, read magazines and attend seminars to further expand your hunting knowledge.

11. Pre-range all of your game trails and particular land marks with your range finder as soon as you get settled in your tree stand.

12. Visualize deer walking the game trails and find the best place possible for a successful shot. Wear wool pants when walking snow or dew covered grass. Wool does not freeze up, it repels water and maintains it’s warmth when soaked in a heavy rain.

13.  Let your cold weather outer gear adjust to the temperature outside before you start walking through the deep snow. This prevents freeze up on your outer clothing.

14.  When pheasant hunting without a dog, run to the downed bird immediately after the shot. Look and listen for the downed bird. Caution: Be careful when hunting with multiple people.

15.  Force pheasants to the outer edges and corners of the field and always prepare yourself for some action when you get to the end of the field. It’s like herding cattle. They have no where else to go but up.

16.  When hunting upland game always walk the best portion of the field into the wind.

17.  When stepping up to get to your treestand, never leave your bow lying directly under you as you ascend in the tree. If the misfortunate thing would happen and you should fall, you want to make sure your bow and arrows are lying off to the side.

18.  Always chain your treestand to the tree. Rope and straps can weather and break in time.

19.  Never use your rifle scope as binoculars. Pointing your high powered rifle at someone or something to identify it can be dangerous.

20.  Invest in a good quality pair of binoculars and use them. (Buy the best optics you can afford, you won’t be sorry). This will help you find more game than you ever thought possible.

21.  Application Dates: Start in early January for planning next Fall hunting trips. Many state application deadlines are due early in the year.

22.  When using disposable heat packs in the Winter, try storing them in a air tight jar or Ziplock after using them. If only exposed to oxygen for a couple hours, the heat packs will reheat again for the rest of their duration if resealed.

23.  When using a mechanical release while bow hunting, they tend to get in the way or tangled with other items while preparing for a hunt. Try flipping the release back and tuck it under your shirt or coat sleeve while climbing your stand or gathering other hunting gear.

24.  When calling multiple coyotes in a the same time, after your initial shot is taken, yelp like a pup immediately following, this will often stop other coyotes long enough for a second shot.

25.  In late December and early January, try using more howls when calling coyotes. Males are establishing territories and are very aggressive at chasing off intruders. Before this time rabbit distress call seem to work best.

26.  When decoying antelope during the September rut, try to sneak within 100 yards or so of the buck before showing the decoy. Any closer has a tendency to spook them off.

27.  Bugling for elk during the September rut can be very exciting. Try hunting with a partner and set the shooter 20-40 yards in front of the caller. If the bull hangs up short of the hunter, the caller should back-off trying to draw the bull back to the shooter.

28.  Treestand placement for bow hunting bear should be 12-20 yards off your bait and at a height of 8-12 feet off the ground. This gives you the best shot angle to hit both lungs.

29.   When refreshing bait for bear hunting, always walk to the bait first, not the treestand. This avoids having bears follow the scent to the stand instead of the bait, giving you poor shot opportunities.

30.  Survival kit: Soak cottonballs with Vasoline petroleum jelly and place them in plastic film container. They make excellent fire starters because the petroleum jelly starts easy and the cottonballs sustain the fire long enough to get the kindling started.